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Teaching jobs in China are a dime a dozen. We’ve helped hundreds of qualified teachers find excellent jobs in China.

Indeed, the jobs are ubiquitous, which is why they’re often overlooked in favour of jobs in the Middle East where money falls from the sky, or South East Asia with sublime beaches and low-cost living.

What is a gig?

A temporary job. Usually void of benefits, such as health care, and pensions. They pay either hourly or as one lump sum. Some longer-term gigs may be salaried but they’re also void of restrictive bosses that have a certain quasi-ownership of their employees.

Don’t get me wrong - over the past 10 years I’ve placed hundreds of South African teachers in rewarding jobs around the world. I like South African candidates - compared to North American or British teachers you are less entitled, you work hard and you have staying power.

An international teaching job was one of my best life experiences. I relocated to in Indonesia for two years and I struggled with the decision to teach abroad at first and whether that particular position was the best one for me at the time.

Most people have done interview practice in the past, learning about how to answer common interview questions and how to avoid common mistakes when giving interview answers. However, most articles, workshops, and seminars on the subject of interview technique are aimed at people applying to huge multinationals with skilled and professional recruitment teams.

It’s always a mistake when I get cocky and write in pen in my lesson plan book. Although it’s gotten a little easier over the years, pacing a lesson is one of the most challenging things for teachers. You have unexpected delays, events, differing abilities among students and difficulty in the material taught.

Notes from Beyond the Middle Kingdom

In November of 2015 the Foreign Language Department of Anqing Teachers University invited me to present a lecture to primary and middle school English teachers. These teachers were participating in a National Teacher Training Program. Having enjoyed participating in this program for several years, I immediately agreed. This year I was in for a real treat.

Ever since I moved to South Korea in 2009 to teach English, I usually get a handful of inquiries every year from new teachers wanting to talk about moving overseas to teach. It’s fun for me—I love re-living my international adventure with prospective ESL teachers, and getting excited vicariously.

“Just because you do not take an interest in politics doesn't mean politics won't take an interest in you.” – Pericles

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