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Going home after teaching English abroad can be pretty intimidating, especially the job part of it. If you don’t want to teach ESL in your home country, what exactly can you do for work? In order to see what people were actually doing, I surveyed 55 old friends and random Internet strangers to find out all the details for you (and myself as well!).

“It is perfectly natural for the future woman to feel indignant at the limitations posed upon her by her sex. The real question is not why she should reject them: the problem is rather to understand why she accepts them.” – Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex.

Teaching overseas can be a great experience - countless articles and blog posts provide advice on how to find the perfect job teaching abroad and what an amazing experience teaching overseas can be.

In my last article I covered how to write a resume for teaching English abroad. This week I’d like to cover some conventional and non-conventional job seeking strategies you can employ to help you find a great job teaching abroad. Many of these same strategies are also applicable to the domestic, non-teaching job market as well.

I’ve been recruiting ESL teachers for nearly 15 years. Over the last decade and a half I have looked at tens of thousands of resumes and helped many thousands of individuals find work teaching English abroad. I have also come to the conclusion that most individuals seeking work as ESL teachers, or seeking work in general, have no idea how or even why to write a resume.

Teaching English is the perfect way to travel, learn about other cultures, and to serve other people. However, the age-old dilemma for all future English teachers is: do you pay for an expensive CELTA certification or go for a usually-less-expensive TESL or TEFL course? The answer really depends on your specific situation.

It’s the holiday season – slightly more than a week to go before Christmas – which means it is time to make sure dear old grandma’s insurance is paid up.  I’ve been recruiting ESL teachers for 10 years, and have a decade’s worth of data showing that more grandparents die the week before Christmas than any other week of the year.

From the time it was founded, America has a strong tradition of being one of the most innovative countries in the world. From the time of Robert Fulton and Alexander Bell, Henry Ford, NASA, IBM, and Boeing, to Bill Gates and Steve Jobs- the US has been at the forefront of technological revolution in the last two centuries.

My husband moved to Korea to teach English about 10 years ago. His boss picked him up from the bus station and promptly brought him to the school where Stephen would be teaching all the little darlings. First day off the plane ended up being his first day of work. If you have worked in Korea before, you know this is not out of the ordinary.

The world went into panic mode when the media released news of the Ebola virus. Spreading rapidly through parts of Africa within months and eventually making its way internationally, the Ebola virus poses a serious threat to those who come into contact with anyone infected.

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