Teacher Blogs

Search by country

NOTE: I’ve used the word nasty prolifically in this blog because no other synonym seems to suffice. I also made some huge culturally-specific generalizations here about hygiene as it pertains to gender. All are based on my experience as a woman who has travelled with boys (by boys I mean grown men who put their dirty backpack on the bed).

“The world begins where the road ends”: Realizations after a year abroad

One of the first things I remember about planning to travel the world before I left to do so many years ago was mentally listing all of the things I was afraid of. They were numerous. Would drug smugglers hide illegal stuff in my backpack at the airport unbeknownst to me? Would hand-sized spiders eat me in my sleep? Would I be able to get by without knowing the local language?

Teachers don’t make a lot of money, especially early childhood teachers who, arguably, have a an important job towards creating a harmonious society.

There’s an idea out there that long term travelers are constantly on holiday. I understand why it appears that way. One minute I’m in Vietnam motorbiking through the mountains and in the next moment I am in Thailand swimming in lagoons far too magical to be real and writing blogs about places I never knew existed a year ago.

Travelling alone is a lot like life–you’re never actually alone. Meeting people might be one of the best parts of travelling solo but so is the chance to “face yourself”, as a friend of mine describes it.

Way out east on the South China Sea, in Hoi An, Vietnam, tucked away in a quiet corner where frangipani trees meet rice fields, is a place called Nomad Yoga. Within Nomad Yoga is a fierce little guru named Rahul.

When I first moved to Indonesia I did a 100-day “happiness challenge” on Facebook. Each day I wrote a short anecdote or sentiment about something I was grateful for. Sometimes it was a bottle of wine. Other times it was a simple smile from a stranger.

I awoke as a delighted child to the sight of misty mountains and the sensation of fresh cool air on my first morning in Sapa, Vietnam. My friend and I finally made it unscathed on our second attempt to escape the 40+ heat of Ha Long Bay. I was snuggled beneath a comforter. I jumped out of bed and went exploring the town. I found a quaint place for breakfast with proper coffee and fresh juice.

I am approaching the age that my 20-year-old self used to see as some distant thing in the future that seemed impossible, like time travel, and then one day my 30-year-old self said, “well shit, if 30 years old and the Internet can happen, then 40 is looking a little more real.” But now I am approaching it with less impending doom that I expected.

Pages

Subscribe to ESL101 Teacher Blogs