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Good Evening All!

For what I think is a first, I'm going to make this post largely video-based, as I've recently taken two videos which I thought are worth sharing:

1) "Try The World" - https://vid.me/bcHI

Hello Everybody!

Given the serious tone of the last post, I felt primed for a lighthearted topic: "mondegreens".

As a comical guy, I quite enjoy mondegreens. Even if you aren't familiar with that word, you know quite a few already:

-If you thought you heard "Hold me closer, Tony Danza." instead of "Hold me closer, tiny dancer.".

or

After five plus years of teaching I no longer consider myself a ‘rookie.’ I’m not yet a ‘veteran’ teacher—someone who has taught for decades, but still, I feel a bit more seasoned than the average teacher, simply because my experience has been so unique.

Hello All!

Time marches on, and brings me along with it. I'll update on some items mentioned in recent posts:

1) The image for this post shows how my business cards have come along. I'm quite glad to see them now, and would recommend moo.com for their helpful staff if you're looking for business cards. We'll see how they are received by others.

Hello All!

Sorry for the one-day delay with this post, as I did end up "too busy" yesterday.

I got married in the summer of 2009, and less than a year later I moved to South Korea to teach English the following spring of 2010, leaving my husband, step-son, family and friends behind. I’m sure some people secretly thought I was crazy. Maybe I was, just a little. I was desperate to stay in career that I had invested so much hard work and money into, and the economy wasn’t cooperating.

Hello Everybody:

First things first (Is this a meaningless expression? As opposed to "first things second"?) - ME.mory is functioning well. If you want to try having a digital memory like I do, then visit http://me.mory.jumpbuttonstudio.com/. There you may access ME.mory in its beta-state.

Going home after teaching English abroad can be pretty intimidating, especially the job part of it. If you don’t want to teach ESL in your home country, what exactly can you do for work? In order to see what people were actually doing, I surveyed 55 old friends and random Internet strangers to find out all the details for you (and myself as well!).

The journey of teaching abroad, for me, has come to an end at least for now. I returned to the United States in 2013 with hopeful attempts at obtaining a teaching position in Michigan, my home state. With three years of teaching experience overseas, plus my student teaching experience behind me, I was very hopeful. I applied and have gotten several interviews, which was promising.

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