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Finding the right teacher is not an easy task. You might get hundreds of applicants, but they don’t have the right requirements. Or, maybe no one is applying for your position. Either way, you’ve got a problem because you have a job opening and you need to fill it––fast.

When we embark on our journey across the world, we know we're going to confront many things that will challenge our perspective of the world. It's one of the reasons we take such adventures because the culture we were raised in doesn't always give us that opportunity so easily.

What is a gig?

A temporary job. Usually void of benefits, such as health care, and pensions. They pay either hourly or as one lump sum. Some longer-term gigs may be salaried but they’re also void of restrictive bosses that have a certain quasi-ownership of their employees.

NOTE: I’ve used the word nasty prolifically in this blog because no other synonym seems to suffice. I also made some huge culturally-specific generalizations here about hygiene as it pertains to gender. All are based on my experience as a woman who has travelled with boys (by boys I mean grown men who put their dirty backpack on the bed).

At any given time, there are thousands of international teaching jobs out there in this great big world. If you’re like most newly graduated teachers looking for work abroad, you might feel a bit overwhelmed. Short term gigs in China and the UAE, part-time positions in South America, and longer term gigs at super-status international schools abound.

“The world begins where the road ends”: Realizations after a year abroad

One of the first things I remember about planning to travel the world before I left to do so many years ago was mentally listing all of the things I was afraid of. They were numerous. Would drug smugglers hide illegal stuff in my backpack at the airport unbeknownst to me? Would hand-sized spiders eat me in my sleep? Would I be able to get by without knowing the local language?

Teachers don’t make a lot of money, especially early childhood teachers who, arguably, have a an important job towards creating a harmonious society.

I’ve met all kinds of people in all kinds of places. One of my favourite places in the world is Chiang Mai. My favourite because I don’t need a point of reference to know that I love it. I’m just free to love it. It doesn’t inspire me to travel to yet unexplored parts, it inspires me to stay. For its spirit but also for solid practical reasons.

Do you want to live and teach English internationally? Eric Haeg, Course Director at TEFL Campus Phuket* in Thailand, is a veteran in the industry and he’s shared some valuable infor-mation and insight about how to get started. ESL101 asked Eric some questions that are critical to anyone interested in teaching English abroad.

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