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At any given time, there are thousands of international teaching jobs out there in this great big world. If you’re like most newly graduated teachers looking for work abroad, you might feel a bit overwhelmed. Short term gigs in China and the UAE, part-time positions in South America, and longer term gigs at super-status international schools abound.

Insurance is one of those things we invest in with hope that we’ll never reap its benefits. Like Lord Krishna says to Arjun in the Bhagavad Gita, in effect, give all of yourself to your duty but expect nothing of the outcome. A statement quite easily applied to both child-raising, travelling, and when you really think about it, insurance.

An international teaching job was one of my best life experiences. I relocated to in Indonesia for two years and I struggled with the decision to teach abroad at first and whether that particular position was the best one for me at the time.

“The world begins where the road ends”: Realizations after a year abroad

One of the first things I remember about planning to travel the world before I left to do so many years ago was mentally listing all of the things I was afraid of. They were numerous. Would drug smugglers hide illegal stuff in my backpack at the airport unbeknownst to me? Would hand-sized spiders eat me in my sleep? Would I be able to get by without knowing the local language?

Teachers don’t make a lot of money, especially early childhood teachers who, arguably, have a an important job towards creating a harmonious society.

Self-transparency or self-disgrace? When is exposing our vulnerability just too much?

Recently, I decided that a great way to spend each birthday is to celebrate someone I aspire to be like. Someone with magic good-person dust, willing to sprinkle it into my needy, greedy palms.

Where am I? I asked myself this a few hundred times a day as I pondered all the things I would have been doing had I not rolled up on this remote tropical island. I had fallen off the map, or it felt that way. I was in a place were clocks don’t matter because the time of day falls into two categories: before sunset and after sunset.

Are Western women easy? The answer depends on who you ask. I am a single white female (SWF) travelling in Indonesia, a country that has conservative values regarding women, so my Western perspective is biased. This musing may provoke a bit of controversy but isn’t that the best kind of reading? It’s certainly the best kind of writing.

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